100 years War Memorial Souldrop

In light of the 100th anniversary of the end of world war 1, It seems an apt time to publish a little bit of detail about the boys and girls who sacrificed their futures for ours

The Souldrop War memorial, Lest we forget

The Souldrop War memorial, Lest we forget

1914-1918
ADAMS John Henry 20 years old
Killed in action Wednesday, 15th November 1916
Private 31464, 58th Company, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry). in France & Flanders. Born and resident Souldrop, enlisted in Ampthill. Son of George Henry and Emma Adams, of Banktop, Souldrop.
Formerly, 23587, Bedfordshire Regiment. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial on the Somme, France. Pier and Face 5 C and 12 C
The Battle of the Ancre 13–18 November, was the final large British attack of the Battle of the Somme in 1916, before winter. (After the Battle of Flers–Courcelette on 22 September, the Anglo-French armies tried to press their advantage with several smaller attacks in quick succession, rather than pause to regroup and give the German army’s time to recover.

BIRD Percy 18 years old
Private 27004 Royal Fusiliers, died 2nd April 1917
Private TR/10/27004, 31st (Training Reserve) Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Died at home Monday, 2nd April 1917. Born Whymington, Northants, enlisted in Bedford, Son of Frederick and Annie Bird, of Souldrop. Buried in All Saints churchyard, Souldrop.

EDWARDS John
Acting Corporal 23660, 4th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment. Killed in action Sunday, 29th April 1917 in France & Flanders. Born and resident Souldrop, enlisted Bedford. Commemorated on Arras memorial, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 5.
The Battle of Arras (also known as the Second Battle of Arras) was a British offensive during the First World War. From 9 April to 16 May 1917, British, Canadian, South African, New Zealand, Newfoundland, and Australian troops attacked German defences near the French city of Arras on the Western Front. There were major gains on the first day, followed by stalemate. The battle cost nearly 160,000 British casualties and about 125,000 German casualties.

JOHNSON Bertie Edward Malkin 25 years old
[Spelt Birty on SDGW] Private 23749, 4th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment.
Died at home Wednesday, 16th May 1917. Born Creaton, Northants, enlisted Ampthill, resident Souldrop. Son of Mrs. H. Johnson, The Green, Creaton, Northants. Buried in St Michael’s churchyard, South-East of church, Great Creaton, Northants.

KNIGHT Arthur Ernest
Private 23752, 4th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment. Killed in action Monday, 13th November 1916 in France. Born Northampton, enlisted Ampthill, resident Souldrop. Commemorated in Y Ravine cemetery, Beamont-Hamel, Somme, France. Special Memorial D. 2.
The Battle of the Ancre 13–18 November, was the final large British attack of the Battle of the Somme in 1916, before winter. (After the Battle of Flers–Courcelette on 22 September, the Anglo-French armies tried to press their advantage with several smaller attacks in quick succession, rather than pause to regroup and give the German armies time to recover.

PEERS Cecil Luke
Private G/14353, 1st Battalion, Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Died of wounds Thursday, 19th September 1918 in France & Flanders. Born Sharnbrook, enlisted Bedford, resident Colworth (sic), Sharnbrook. Buried in Brie british cemetery on the Somme, France. Grave I. E. 3.
Cannot find much, probably involved in the attack on the Hindenburg Line after crossing the St. Quentin Canal.

PRIGMORE Edward 26 years old
Rifleman 2053, 4th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own). Died of wounds Tuesday, 2nd March 1915 in France & Flanders. Born and resident Souldrop, enlisted Bedford. Son of Arthur and Sarah Jane Prigmore, of Souldrop.
Buried in Bailleul communal cemetery (NORD), Nord, France. Grave T. II.
Bailleul was occupied on 14 October 1914 by the 19th Brigade and the 4th Division. It became an important railhead, air depot and hospital centre, with the 2nd, 3rd, 8th, 11th, 53rd, 1st Canadian and 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Stations quartered in it for considerable periods. It was a Corps headquarters until July 1917, when it was severely bombed and shelled, and after the Battle of Bailleul (13-15 April 1918), it fell into German hands and was not retaken until 30 August 1918.

RICH Herbert
Private 23217, 4th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment. Killed in action Monday, 23rd April 1917 in France. Born and resident Souldrop, enlisted Ampthill. Son of Mrs. S. A. Rich, of Souldrop. Co Likely involved inmmemorated on the Arras Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 5.
Likely involved in
The Battle of Arras (also known as the Second Battle of Arras) was a British offensive during the First World War. From 9 April to 16 May 1917, British, Canadian, South African, New Zealand, Newfoundland, and Australian troops attacked German defences near the French city of Arras on the Western Front. There were major gains on the first day, followed by stalemate. The battle cost nearly 160,000 British casualties and about 125,000 German casualties.

SMITH Leonard
Private 9867, 2nd Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment. Killed in action 15th June 1915 in France. Born and resident Souldrop, enlisted Bedford.
Likely involved in
The Battle of Festubert (15–25 May 1915) was an attack by the British army in the Artois region of France on the western front during World War I. The offensive formed part of a series of attacks by the French Tenth Army and the British First Army in the Second Battle of Artois (3 May – 18 June 1915). After the failure of the attempted breakthrough by the First Army in the attack at Aubers Ridge (9 May 1915) tactics of a short hurricane bombardment and an infantry advance with unlimited objectives, were replaced by the French practice of slow and deliberate artillery-fire intended to prepare the way for an infantry attack. A continuous three-day bombardment by the British heavy artillery was planned, to cut wire and demolish German machine-gun posts and infantry strong-points. The German defences were to be captured by a continuous attack, by one division from Rue du Bois to Chocolat Menier Corner and by a second division 600 yards (550 m) north, which was to capture the German trenches to the left of Festubert village. The objectives were 1,000 yards (910 m) forward, rather than the 3,000 yards (2,700 m) depth of advance intended at Aubers Ridge. The battle was the first British attempt at attrition.

1939-1945

TIPPING Raymond 24 years old
Sapper 2152706 281 Field Park Coy., Royal Engineers who died on Monday, 11th October 1943. Son of William and Gwendoline Tipping. Buried in Bari war cemetery in Italy. Grave XIV. A. 33.
Not on memorial but in the churchyard

KNIGHTS Audrey 21 years old
Private W/263093, Auxilary Territorial Service. Died Sunday, 15th October 1944. Daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Mary Knights, of Souldrop. Sister of the below. Buried in All Saints churchyard, Souldrop.

KNIGHTS Dorothy 25 years old
Lance Corporal W/212611, Auxilary Territorial Service. Died Monday, 26th August 1946. Daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Mary Knights, of Souldrop. Sister of the above. Buried in All Saints churchyard, Souldrop.

There will be a Service at Souldrop’s All Saints Church Sunday 11th November 2018 at 10.30am. The Service will move out to the memorial for 11am and will last until 11.30am

Can anyone identify this 1920’s Souldrop House?

Large Souldrop House, can anyone identify the Souldrop house in this 1920's photo?

Large Souldrop House, can anyone identify the Souldrop house in this 1920’s photo?

Here the same house but with added flower beds

Here the same house but with added flower beds

A Bedfordshire postcard archivist has asked if this 1920’s photograph of a large Souldrop house can be identified, apparently it is not the rectory.
If you do have an idea please let us know using our below comment boxes or contact us here

We will then forward the information to the archivist. Thanks!

Wartime Memories

I would like to share a wartime memory sent in by a Mr Lawrence Lampert, whom as a child was evacuated from bombed out London to stay with a family in Souldrop.

Perhaps there is someone out there who might remember Lawrence or have their own memories from the Second World War. Please feel free to use our comment box below if you would like to contribute.

During world war two, my sister and I were sent from bombed out London to Souldrop. With a label tag on our coats we arrived by train and bus and the WI ladies line us up and we were put in line for selection by the local folk……. We were chose by Arthur & Katherine who were farmhands for Mr.Haroldon his farm some miles out of the village…….He tended the sheep and did general farm work…….we live din the tied terrace cottage across the road from the farm…..There were Italian POWs working on the farm under the scrutiny of armed soldiers and the Land army girls drove the tractor and shire horses and women drove the local bus… We went to the local village school and our teacher was Miss Bagshawe…… the school seemed a couple of miles away passed a Methodist chapel…….. Harvest festival was in the big church and the evacuees got a parcel each after the service……. I remember the sheep dogs Judy & Tricksey who also rounded up the cattle
I wonder if you can  help trace further details of these folk for me and my Grandchildren who are covering ‘evacuees’ as a school project.
I currently live in Rothbury, Northumberland… but I have many clear memories of Souldrop, and the American Airforce folk one met in Rushden on market days..They had many a kind words for the evacuees and chewing gum, and were genuinely feeling for us fathe evacuees whose fathers were killed fighting in France and Holland and whose Mothers were bombed in the blitz.

I wrote back to Lawrence and told him of the ‘bomb squad’ incident a couple years back and also mentioned we would keep our eyes and ears open for others that may be able to share memories with him.

Dear Steve, Thanks for your speedy response……..if you do find local oldies who remember the ‘evacuees’ let me know… it might be worthwhile asking your local WI as those ladies plus the ‘Lady of the mansion’ seemed to be involved with organising the ‘evacuees’……….I do remember the school shut at harvest time and everyone went into the fields to help… your records may also show the names of the local farm owners too.
regards    Lawrence Lampert

If anyone wishes to correspond with Lawrence, I have his email address if you contact me at…   souldrop.steve@gmail.com I will forward Lawrence’s email contact details.

Alternatively, please feel free to use the below comment box to contribute your memories.You can use your normal Facebook, Yahoo, AOL or Hotmail accounts to do so.

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